Central Oregon’s Cascades

Broken Top & South Sister (Canon SX50)

Saturday, March 16, 2019

The Cascades are visible once again and now glowing after weeks of being shrouded in show. I couldn’t wait for their re-emergence to photograph them. It hardly matters that over the years I’ve photographed often the portion of that range visible from my property. Each time feels like a new venture, maybe because shifting weather and light affects the view. Maybe because the mountains seem magical.

The Oregon Cascade range is 260 miles long. The peaks most easily visible from my property are Mt. Bachelor, Broken Top, and the Three Sisters. On a clear day, while I might see more northward mountains, my usual captures from Bachelor to the Sisters take little effort. I’m fond anyway of these particular beauties, having covered on horseback many of their trails. Close observation increases their loveliness.

My favorite is Broken Top, a collapsed volcano. It sinks in the middle and demands attention. Wonderful trails cross-cross the mountain itself, and there’s a unique trail from Todd Lake to Green River that takes travelers next to Broken Top’s craggy profile.

Broken Top (Canon SX50)

Mountains fascinate, they’re so complex–on the one hand appearing permanent and stable, and on the other having the potential to blow, like Mt. St. Helens in 1980. The South Sister, a popular hiking mountain, is a rather-alive volcano, watched closely because it might erupt someday. I cross fingers that the peak won’t change for many years ahead. Its precarious nature is “the stuff” that generates folk songs and poems.

South Sister (Canon SX50)

Once I tried to hike up the South Sister and this quickly proved too much. Some of my friends do make it to the top, and some climb regularly! I’m happy simply hearing how much effort is required to ascend and about the great views up there.

From my vantage point down by the barn, the South Sister is placed in a way that prevents my capturing all three Sisters at once. Photographed separately, the Middle and South Sisters create an image of musical-like symmetry.

Middle & North Sisters (Canon SX50)

Mt. Bachelor is the southernmost of Central Oregon’s Range and a popular skiing destination that helps to keep this area full of tourists. It’s also a gateway to the Cascades Lakes Highway, which provides access to numerous mountain lakes and trails.

Mt. Bachelor (Canon SX50)

Here’s a little local lore from Oregon’s Department of Transportation: “In the mid-1960s astronauts practiced along the Cascade Lakes Highway to prepare for Apollo missions to the Moon. In 1971, Astronaut Jim Irwin of the Apollo 15 mission placed an earth rock from a volcanic dome near Devil’s Lake on the lunar surface. It’s the only earth rock on the moon.”

The Cascades are fun!

Dear Friends, Geology is fascinating stuff both for learning and playing. Diana

One thought on “Central Oregon’s Cascades

  1. Love the photos. I didn’t know about the Devil’s Lake rock on the moon.🙌

    On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 7:24 AM Diana’s Morning Blog wrote:

    > trailriderincentraloregon posted: ” Broken Top & South Sister (Canon SX50) > Saturday, March 16, 2019 The Cascades are visible once again and now > glowing after weeks of being shrouded in show. I couldn’t wait for their > re-emergence to photograph them. It hardly matters that over th” >

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s