Strung Out

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Yesterday for hours I struggled alongside a fence line, pushing ahead with my foot a reel of wire and dragging a bucket of tools. The fence segregates an area belonging to my horses. I’m focused on the essential work of stopping horses from chewing on wooden fence posts. The new wire must reinvigorate an electric wire already atop the fence that too-often fails to provide a surprise “don’t touch” shock to inquisitive muzzles.

My wire reel holding one-quarter mile of wire is too heavy to carry while I’m trying to re-string. So I must kick it ahead while attaching the loosening new wire to existing insulators. This much close contact with fence and wire lets me spot some reasons the old wire has shorted-out. There are wire sags touching bits of fencing, and in spots low-swinging tree limbs land on wire.

Early that day starting this work, I selected a few useful tools, like pliers, a hammer, and a wire cutter. Before the stringing episode ended, I was forced many times to return to the barn for suddenly-needed tools. As an example, I’m short and high spots in the fencing called for a ladder to take me higher and gain force in re-hammering nails.

Also, there were the horses. Seeing me in their area and dragging something with wheels, they assumed eats were coming and clustered around to check out everything. I enjoy my horses, but they’re too much when surrounding closely. I particularly watch Sunni who’s very nosy and likes to tip my tool bucket. I had to keep waving away the horses and it took awhile to get free of them.

Before starting to re-string the fence wire, I knew next-to-nothing about electrical circuits. As usual, the force of experience made learning happen. After studying the existing wiring and watching YouTube videos, I went out to put into practice whatever seemed logical. Finally, my fence’s new top wire responded positively to a test meter.

There remains a bunch of heavy wire on that one-quarter mile reel. This wire will continue a job not yet half-finished. Today, after addressing more needed wire on top rails, I’ll start replacing a center-running hot wire that’s to prevent horses from scratching butts and loosening fence fabric.

The work so far is a success that makes me proud. Always before I’ve hired handymen to check and repair fence wiring. But having the minimum done to ensure electricity flowing in a short time tends to fail. And then, the horses start chewing on wood. This time, by re-stringing all wire, the fix should survive through and beyond upcoming winter months.

Anyway and at last, I know how to test and repair electric wire on fencing.

Dear Friends: Kinesthetic learning has been huge in my survival stories. Diana

One thought on “Strung Out

  1. Chores keep us strong — you more than me since I often hand the harder ones off to Dave.🤔🙋

    On Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 7:51 AM Diana’s Morning Blog wrote:

    > trailriderincentraloregon posted: ” Wednesday, October 23, 2019 Yesterday > for hours I struggled alongside a fence line, pushing ahead with my foot a > reel of wire and dragging a bucket of tools. The fence segregates an area > belonging to my horses. I’m focused on the essential work of” >

    Like

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